Divine Designs God’s Creation

"The works of the LORD are great" Bible verse poster. Photo and poster by David Clode.

“The works of the LORD are great” Bible verse poster. Photo and poster by David Clode.

Divine Designs God’s Creation.

Designs and patterns in nature/God’s creation.

Can it really all be just by chance?

To me, the obvious design in nature, from things too small to see with the naked eye through to things on an astronomical scale, is a strong argument for a Designer, in the same way that behind every painting there is an artist, buildings are built by builders, and so on.

The alternative is to believe that the patterns and order we see in the universe, or even just a painting or building, happened entirely as a result of chance and time, or by accident if you like. If this is your opinion, hopefully the images of design in nature on this page will convince you that there is indeed a Creator; that He has a fabulous flair for glorious designs, and that He is well and truly worthy of our worship and obedience to His commands, including that we believe in Jesus Christ for salvation.

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Jewel Flutterer dragonfly. Photo: David Clode.

Jewel Flutterer dragonfly Rhyothemis resplendens. Photo: David Clode.

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Snowflake crystals formed on a bubble. Photo: Aaron Burden on unsplash.com.

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“Wonder is the basis of worship”

Thomas Carlyle.

Bear in mind also that individual created things also interact within complex, intricate ecosystems, and that there are complex interactions within living organisms at a cellular level, right through to interactions on an astronomical scale.

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“For every house is built by someone, but He who built all things is God”

Hebrews 3:4.

“I will meditate on the glorious splendour of Your majesty,

And on Your wondrous works”

“Stand still and consider the wondrous works of God”

Psalm 145:5, Psalm 37:14.

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I am thankful that I have been extremely blessed to see and experience some of the best things the natural world has to offer, including some of the most beautiful wildflowers in the world – the Cape Fynbos, and Namaqualand (in South Africa – I have also enjoyed growing hundreds of Fynbos plants in gardens), the biggest and best land wildlife in the world in the African bush, the weird and wonderful flora and fauna of Australia, the fish and coral of the Great Barrier Reef and Pacific Islands…and so on. All this inspires me, and I hope the subjects here will inspire you too, perhaps to paint and photograph, or just to contemplate, enjoy, and give thanks to God for His wonderful creation. The selection of subject matter is limited by a lack of knowledge on my part, and is an arbitrary and personal choice. The subjects in these photos barely scratch the surface. A left click on many of these photos will show a larger photo.

Nautilus shell cross-section. Photo: cuny.edu/wikifiles.

Nautilus shell cross-section. Photo: cuny.edu/wikifiles.

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No one in their right mind would say this stair case happened by chance. Photo: Dan Freeman on unsplash.com.( I have laterally inverted the photo and added a yellow filter to make it easier to compare to the nautilus shell).

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“Posterity will someday laugh at the foolishness

of modern materialistic philosophy.

The more I study nature,

the more I am amazed at the Creator.”

Louis Pasteur

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The size of the Erath compared to the size of the Sun. Photo:

The size of the Earth compared to the size of the Sun. Photo: http://sunearthday.nasa,gov.

The size of the Earth compared to the size of the Sun. For more information on how changes in solar activity cause changes in the Earth’s climate, see: http://reforestation.me/climate-change-reforestation/

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DIVINE DESIGNS – PAINTINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS

The few paintings shown are attempts to capture the abstract essence of the design or pattern of a particular species of animal – expressed as a plan view or like a blueprint, as if you were going to manufacture them. The paintings are an attempt to produce a synthesis based on many individuals of the species, or a form of the species. Most of the photos speak for themselves.

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen,

being understood by the things that are made,

even His eternal power and Godhead…”

Romans 1: 20.

Clouded leopard. Photo: terrambiente.org.

“I just saw my reflection. I’m gorgeous!” Clouded leopard. Photo: terrambiente.org.

Fish – painting and photos

Picasso Triggerfish. Photo: able2know.org.

The aptly named Picasso Triggerfish. Photo: able2know.org.

The painting below shows the design of the Clown Triggerfish, expressed like a blueprint.

Abstract painting of the design of the Clown Triggerfish. Acrylic painting by David Clode.

Abstract painting of the design of the Clown Triggerfish. Acrylic painting by David Clode.

An example of a Clown Triggerfish fish below, just to show that I am not making it up:

Clown triggerfish. Photo: inthetank.com.

Clown Triggerfish. Photo: inthetank.com.

Clown Triggerfish. More fish and marine life photos further down the page.

Reptiles – photos and paintings

Geometric tortoise. Photo: Atherton de Villiers.

Geometric tortoise South Africa. Photo: Atherton de Villiers.

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Jewelled chameleon. Photo: Jorn Kohler. Arkive.org.

Jewelled chameleon. Photo: Jorn Kohler. Arkive.org.

Jewelled chameleon. More chameleons further down the page – have a look, its worth it.

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“All things were created through Him and for Him.

And He is before all things, and in Him all things consist”

Colossians 1:16b,17.

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“Also he spoke of trees, from the cedar tree of Lebanon

even to the hyssop that springs out of the wall;

he spoke also of animals, of birds,

of creeping things, and of fish.”

1 Kings 4:33. Describing King Solomon.

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Golden yellow form of the Cape cobra Naja nivea. Photo:

Golden yellow form of the Cape Cobra Naja nivea. Photo: mazdawildlifephotography.com.

Snakes. Snakes may not be your favourite animal, and snakes can be a symbol of evil, but they can also be a symbol of good (e.g. Moses raising the bronze serpent which people looked to and were healed, a picture of Christ on the cross – Numbers 21:9, 2 Kings 18:4, John 3:14). Speaking of bronze serpents, the golden yellow form of the Cape Cobra on the left fits the bill. Many years ago, a friend and I nearly stepped on one just like this on the Cape Flats, South Africa. On this page the focus is not on symbolism, but simply and objectively on the colourful and geometric patterns or designs.

Rhinoceros viper design – the painting below is an interpretation and an attempt at a distillation of the design of the Rhinoceros viper, Bitis nasicornis, a snake found in the rain forests of Central Africa.

Bitis nasicornis ed hor 2

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"Nasicornis". An interpretation of the pattern of the Rhinoceros viper, Bitis nasicornis.

“Nasicornis”. An interpretation of the pattern of the Rhinoceros viper, Bitis nasicornis.

A few examples of what the Rhinoceros viper looks like below, with many subtle variations in colour and pattern in different individuals (many more variations than shown in these photos):

Bitis nasicornis. Photo Chantel sareptiles.co.za

Bitis nasicornis Rhinoceros viper. Photo Chantel sareptiles.co.za

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Bitis nasicornis head. Photo: Ray Hunter Cobraman.net.

Bitis nasicornis head. Photo: Ray Hunter Cobraman.net.

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Rhinoceros Viper Bitis nasicornis. Photo: Mazuch T. Serpentes.eu.

Rhinoceros Viper Bitis nasicornis. Photo: Mazuch T. Serpentes.eu.

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Gaboon Adder (or Gaboon Viper) design:

Gaboon viper. Divine design of the Gaboon viper, Bitis gabonica. Pastel painting by David Clode.

Gaboon viper. Divine design of the Gaboon viper, Bitis gabonica. Pastel painting by David Clode.

A sketchy, pastel impression of the essence of the pattern of the Gaboon Adder. Perhaps the pattern of this snake was the original inspiration for modern day Ndebele art. One example of what the Gaboon Adder looks like below (there are variations):

Bitis gabonica. Photo: echitobplusicp.org.

Bitis gabonica, East African form. Photo: echitobplusicp.org.

It is amazing how well this strong geometrical pattern, with mostly straight lines, works as camouflage among the curved lines of fallen leaves in its African rain forest habitat. Of course the straight lines become curved on the round body of the snake, which is also normally coiled up in some form of an “s” shape. Spot the snake below:

Bitis gabonica Gaboon viper. Camouflaged among leaves, bottom left. Kosi Bay South Africa. Photo: sareptiles.co.za.

Bitis gabonica Gaboon viper. Camouflaged among leaves, bottom left. The snake’s head is on the left. Kosi Bay South Africa. Photo: sareptiles.co.za.

Believe it or not, this one is relatively easy to see, as it is lying on top of the leaves. They are often half-hidden beneath the leaves, which makes them almost impossible to spot.

Ethiopian Mountain Adder Bitis parviocula. Photo: HGHjim, Snakebuddies.net.

Ethiopian Mountain Adder Bitis parviocula. Photo: HGHjim, Snakebuddies.net., preservevenomous.com.

Ethiopian Mountain Adder Bitis parviocula.

Cape Mountain Adder or Bergadder design below:

berg adder ed

“Atropos”. A loose interpretation (some artistic licence here) of a greenish form of a Cape Mountain Adder or Bergadder, Bitis atropos. A more typical grey and black example below:

Bitis atropos, the Bergadder or Cape Mountain Adder. Typical colouration. Photo:

Bitis atropos, the Bergadder or Cape Mountain Adder. Typical colouration. Photo: C. J. Reitz (see reference below).

“Digital” camouflage on snakes:

Digital camouflage before computer-aided design.

Digital camouflage before computer-aided camouflage design – see the uniforms of U. S., Canadian and Jordanian soldiers. Timor python.Photo: yurigal.exblog.jp.

Python timoriensis. Digital camouflage in nature – if you do an image search for Cadpat TM and Marpat TM for example, for computer-aided camouflage design, you can see the similarities. In this snake, instead of a pattern of square or rectangular pixels, the marks are more like diagonal diamonds, complete with dithering.

Kanburian Bamboo Viper Crytelytrops venustus. Photo: Snakebuddies.net.

Kanburian Bamboo Viper Crytelytrops venustus. Photo: Snakebuddies.net.

More diamond digital camouflage. At a distance, the green and red would mix optically and form a brownish colour.

Mangshan Pit Viper. Photo: Protobothrops mangshanensis. Photo: Snakebuddies.net.

Mangshan Pit Viper. Photo: Protobothrops mangshanensis. Photo: Snakebuddies.net.

A Mangshan pit viper – more advanced and sophisticated than digital camouflage and most other modern camouflage designs, with blending/blurring combined with sharp edges (like Multicam TM camouflage), as well as a very detailed micropattern (absent from Multicam TM). Multicam TM seems to be the preferred choice of Australian SAS troops in Afghanistan – and they would know. Nevertheless, it seems it is still possible to improve on Multicam TM.  I have started another site where I have designed camouflage for anti-poaching units for protecting tigers, rhinos, elephants etc., and possibly the military – click here http://camouflagepatterns.wordpress.com/.

Garter snakes. Photo: biologicalexceptions.blogspot.com.

Garter snakes. Photo: biologicalexceptions.blogspot.com.

A beautiful colour form of the North American Garter snake (a Californian form).

Western Barred Spitting Cobra.

Western Barred Spitting Cobra Naja nigricollis nigricincta. Namibia, Angola. Photo: projectnoah.org.

The Western Barred Spitting Cobra Naja nigricollis nigricincta. Black and white or black and yellow/orange bands are usually a warning signal in nature – e.g. wasps, Coral snakes, the back of tigers’ ears, etc. The contrasting tones of light and dark can be seen by other animals even if they do not have good colour vision. In North Queensland Australia, people have experimented with wetsuits with broad bands of black and white, and painted the underside of Kayaks in broad bands of black and white in an attempt to deter sharks… and apparently, so far so good.

Diagram showing the curved venom canal of a spitting cobra, which projects venom forward in a spray.

Diagram showing a typical cobra/elapid fang on the left, and the curved venom canal of a spitting cobra, which projects venom forward in a spray. Diagram: C. J. Reitz (see refrence below).

Instead of a venom canal which goes straight down, spitting cobras have a canal which is “L” shaped. The venom is forced out under pressure, and the “L” shape directs the venom in a forward spray. They can “spit” up to 2.5 metres, and normally aim for movement. If the venom gets into your eyes it can result in at least temporary blindness.

Mammals

Maasai giraffe. Photo: Graeme Guy.

Maasai giraffe. Photo: Graeme Guy.

“Am I cute or what!”

Reticulated giraffe. Photo: animalcorner.co.uk.

Reticulated giraffe. Photo: animalcorner.co.uk.

Birds

Lilac-breasted Roller.

Lilac-breasted Roller. Africa. Photo:  Flickr.com.

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Rainbow Lorikeet. Photo: Sheila Smart.

Rainbow Lorikeet. Australia. Photo: Sheila Smart. acuteaday.com.

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Wilson's Bird of Paradise. Photo:

Wilson’s Bird of Paradise. Papua New Guinea. Photo: benedante.blogspot.com.

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Bleeding-heart pigeon. Photo: David Clode.

Bleeding-heart pigeon. Photo: David Clode.

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Cassowary, Photo: Birdworld, Kuranda, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Cassowary. Photo: Birdworld, Kuranda, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Female Double-eyed Figparrot. Photo: David Clode.

Female Double-eyed Figparrot. Photo: David Clode.

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Mandarin duck plumage. Photo: David Clode.

Mandarin duck plumage. Photo: David Clode.

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Rainbow Bee-eater flying over its nest (an underground tunnel). Photo: David Clode.

Rainbow Bee-eater flying over its nest (an underground tunnel). Photo: David Clode.

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Blue and Yellow Macaw. Photo: David Clode.

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Male Peacock. Photo: wikipedia.org.

Peacock, India. Photo: wikipedia.org.

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All things bright and beautiful free Christian hymn poster. Words by Cecil Frances Alexander, photo and poster by David Clode. The bird is a Sun Conure, a type of parrot which is native to the rain forests of South America

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Amphibians

Red-eyed treefrog from Centarl America.

Red-eyed treefrog from Central America. Photo: Animalspicturesgallery.blogspot.com.

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Frog photo by Trevor Cole on Unsplash.com.

Painted Reed Frog below:

Painted Reed Frog. Africa.

Painted Reed Frog. Africa. Photo: Staticflickr.com.

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Holy cross frog Notaden bennettii.

Holy cross frog Notaden bennetti Australia.. Photo: Flickr.com.

Perhaps this type of amphibian was the original inspiration, or one of the things which inspired the “dot” style in Central Australian Aboriginal art. It also reminds me of Georges Seurat and Pointillism.

"Hang in there!" Green Treefrog. Photo: David Clode.

“Hang in there!” Green Treefrog. Photo: David Clode.

Reptiles continued…

Panther chameleon. Photo: bioexpedition.com.

Panther chameleon. Photo: bioexpedition.com.

“Am I hot or what!”

Male Panther Chameleon.

Panther chameleon. Photo: earthsfeaturedcreatures.blogspot.com.

Panther chameleon. Photo: earthsfeaturedcreatures.blogspot.com.

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Panther chameleon. Photo: flchams.com.

Panther chameleon. Photo: flchams.com.

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Veiled chameleon. Photo: bioreptilen.com

Veiled chameleon. Photo: bioreptilen.com

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Veiled chameleon. photo: en.wikipedia.org.

Veiled chameleon. photo: en.wikipedia.org.

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Carpet chameleon. Photo: flchams.com.

Carpet chameleon. Photo: flchams.com.

Of course the chameleon’s tongue is another example of divine design.

Evil no doubt, but nevertheless perfectly designed for what they do. Estuarine crocodile Crocodylus porosus. Photo: David Clode, Yorkeys, Cairns, Australia.

Evil no doubt, but nevertheless perfectly designed for what they do. Estuarine crocodile Crocodylus porosus. Photo: David Clode, Yorkeys, Cairns, Australia.

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Fish and marine life continued…

Leafy Sea dragon. photo: marinebio.org.

Leafy Sea dragon. photo: marinebio.org.

Marine life can be beautiful, bizarre, or both.

Leafy Sea Dragon. Photo: Uwphotographyguide.com.

Leafy Sea Dragon. Photo: Uwphotographyguide.com.

I have been very lucky to see one of these while scuba diving at Portsea Pier (Melbourne, Australia).

Ghost pipefish. Photo: Redbubble.net.

Ornate Ghost Pipefish. Photo: Redbubble.net.

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Ornate cofish. Aracana ornata. Photo: fishesofaustralia.net.au.

Ornate cowfish. Aracana ornata. Photo: fishesofaustralia.net.au.

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Mandarinfish. Photo: 2.bp.blogspot.com.

Mandarinfish. Photo: 2.bp.blogspot.com.

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Mandarifish. Photo: ezinemark.com.

Mandarinfish. Photo: ezinemark.com.

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Rainbow fish Chilatherina alleni. Photo: G. R. Allen.

Rainbow fish Chilatherina alleni. Photo: G. R. Allen.

Newly discovered Rainbow fish, Papua New Guinea.

Remhora or sucker fish. Clearly designed for a specific task.

Remora or sucker fish. Clearly designed for a specific task. Photo: David Clode.

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Seastar (or starfish) with an intricate pattern. Approximately 12 inches/30cm in diameter. Green Island Great Barrier Reef. Photo: David Clode.

Seastar (or starfish) with an intricate pattern. Approximately 12 inches/30cm in diameter. Green Island Great Barrier Reef. Photo: David Clode.

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Nautilus shell cross-section. Photo: cuny.edu/wikifiles.

Nautilus shell cross-section. Photo: cuny.edu/wikifiles.

If nothing like a Nautilus shell existed, and this was a piece of hand-crafted jewellery in gold or silver, it would be considered a masterpiece of design and craftsmanship, created by a genius. Surely this could not have come about merely by chance and time.

Coneshell pattern. Photo: Scottcamazine.com.

Coneshell pattern. Photo: Scottcamazine.com.

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Shell, Green Isand, Great Barrier Reef Australia. Photo: David Clode.

Shell, Green Isand, Great Barrier Reef Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Murex shell. Photo: commons.wikimedia.org.

Murex shell. Photo: commons.wikimedia.org.

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Extinct cephalopod. Photo: C. Aitchison-flickr.

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This Great and Wide Sea poster. Pastel painting by Sian Butler, poster by David Clode.

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Insects and other arthropods

"The works of the LORD are great" Bible verse poster. Photo and poster by David Clode.

“The works of the LORD are great” Bible verse poster. Photo and poster by David Clode.

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Leafhopper. Photo: Richard-Seaman.com.

Leafhopper. Photo: Richard-Seaman.com.

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Female Golden Stagbeetle. Lamprima aurata. Victoria Australia. Photo: wikipedia.org.

Female Golden Stagbeetle. Lamprima aurata. Victoria Australia. Photo: wikipedia.org.

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Hemipteran bug, Mount marbu. Photo: Julian Bayliss/Kew.

Hemipteran bug, Mount Marbu. Photo: Julian Bayliss/Kew.

A recently discovered species from Mount Marbu, Mozambique, Africa.

Giant malysian Shield praing mantis. Photo:Igor Siwanowicz, dailymail.co.uk.

Giant Malaysian Shield Praying Mantis. Photo: Igor Siwanowicz, dailymail.co.uk.

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Spiny Flower mantis. Photo: Igor Siwanowics, dailymail.co.uk.

Spiny Flower Mantis. Photo: Igor Siwanowics, dailymail.co.uk.

The pattern on the wings is probably a mimic of the eyes of a much larger animal, and used as a defensive display.

Sanzima's Tarantula. Photo: Rogerio Bertani.

Sanzima’s Tarantula. Photo: Rogerio Bertani.

A newly discovered species from Brazil.

Dragonflies:

Dragonfly wings. Photo: David Clode.

Dragonfly wings. Photo: David Clode.

The intricate design of a dragonfly’s wings. Austrogomphus prasinus.

Dragonflies are loaded with biomimetic potential, says engineer Michelle Lee… humans are avidly copying dragonfly wings to design robots, anti-aircraft missiles, drones, micro wind turbines, and micro-air vehicles. Dragonflies will be owed billions in royalties“.

Booth, C. and Thynne, J. “Celebrating the dragons of the sky”. Wildlife Australia magazine, Spring 2015 vol. 52 no.3, pg 24.

Graphic Flutterer Rhyothemis graphiptera. Cattana wetlands. Photo: David Clode.

Graphic Flutterer Rhyothemis graphiptera. Cattana wetlands. Photo: David Clode.

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The intricate design of a dragonfly's eyes. Macro photo of the eyes of Austrogomphus prasinus, Freshwater lake, cairns. photo: David Clode.

The intricate design of a dragonfly’s eyes. Macro photo of the eyes of Austrogomphus prasinus, Freshwater lake, Cairns. Photo: David Clode.

The intricate design of dragonfly eyes.

Dragonfly eyes close up. Photo: David Clode

Dragonfly eyes close up. Photo: David Clode

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Dragonfly wings. Photo: David Clode.

Dragonfly wings. Rhyothemis phyllis. Photo: David Clode.

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Rhyothemis resplendens. Resplendent indeed! Photo: David Clode.

Rhyothemis resplendens. Resplendent indeed! Photo: David Clode.

A gorgeous dragonfly – a Jewel Flutterer, Rhyothemis resplendens.

Dragonflies (and hummingbirds) are sometimes compared to helicopters. However, unlike helicopters, “when one pair (of dragonfly wings) beats down, creating a vortex, the other pair can capture its energy to create lift. Dragonflies can fly backwards, forwards and sideways, hover and glide, accelerate rapidly and turn almost instantaneously. They can do a slow 90 degree yaw in in just two wing beats.” Perhaps the dragonfly’s closest but still distant competitor for aerobatic ability would be the British Westland Lynx helicopter.

Ibid, page 22.

"Helicopter". Tropical Rockmaster Damselfly. Crystal cascades. Photo: David Clode.

“Helicopter”. Tropical Rockmaster Damselfly, taking off. Crystal Cascades. Photo: David Clode.

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Dragonfly phot, manipulated in Photoshop Elements, David Clode.

Dragonfly phot, manipulated in Photoshop Elements, David Clode.

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Flying dragonfly. This photo was overexposed and not much good, but I fiddled with it in photoshop elements to produce a photo which I think captures something of the miracle of dragonfly flight. Graphic Flutterer Rhyothemis graphiptera. Photo: David Clode.

Flying dragonfly. This photo was overexposed and not much good, but I fiddled with it in photoshop elements to produce an image which I think captures something of the miracle of dragonfly flight. Graphic Flutterer Rhyothemis graphiptera. Photo: David Clode.

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Dragonfly in flight. Rhyothemis phyllis. Photo: David Clode.

Dragonfly in flight. Rhyothemis phyllis. Photo: David Clode.

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Flying dragonfly Hemicordulia australiae. Cairns Botanic Gardens. Photo: David Clode.

Flying dragonfly Hemicordulia australiae. Cairns Botanic Gardens. Photo: David Clode.

More insects:

A camouflaged stick insect. barron Gorge National Park, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

A camouflaged stick insect. Barron Gorge National Park, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

A stick insect mimics its habitat. On the left, tail at the bottom left.

A leafy Katydid, which mimics a leaf which works as camouflage. Photo: David Clode.

A leafy Katydid, which mimics a leaf which works as camouflage. In this photo the insect is in a place where it is easy to see. Photo: David Clode.

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Orange Lacewing butterfly. Photo: David Clode.

Orange Lacewing butterfly. Photo: David Clode.

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All things bright and beautiful free hymn poster. Words by Cecil Frances Alexander, photo and poster by David Clode. The butterfly is a wild female Cairns Birdwing, sipping nectar from an ixora flower, and ironically photographed near the butterfly sanctuary in Kuranda, North Queensland, Australia. This butterfly is related to the largest butterfly in the world, the Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing, found in Eastern New Guinea.

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Plants

Travellers' palm, Ravenala madagascariensis, Madagascar.

Leaf bases of a Traveller’s Palm, Ravenala madagascariensis, Madagascar. Photo: David Clode.

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Half open flower of a Brazilian Walking Iris Neomarica gracilis. Photo: David Clode.

Half open flower of a Brazilian Walking Iris Neomarica gracilis. Photo: David Clode.

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Leaf veins. Photo: David Clode.

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New leaf, water lily Euryale ferox.. Photo: David Clode.

New leaf, water lily Euryale ferox.. Photo: David Clode.

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“God writes the gospel not in the Bible alone,

but also on the trees, and in flowers

and the clouds and the stars”

Martin Luther

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All things bright and beautiful free Christian song poster. Words by Cecil Frances Alexander, photo and poster by David Clode. The flower is Gustavia superba, native to the rain forests of South America.

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Gloriosa lily. Photo david Clode.

Gloriosa lily, or Flame lily, tropical Africa. Photo: David Clode.

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Backlit Elephant's ear leaf. Photo: David Clode.

Backlit Elephant’s Ear or Cunjevoi leaf. Photo: David Clode.

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Symmetrical scaley skin covering the seeds or nuts of the Carolina Ivory Nut palm. Photo: David Clode.

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Johannesteijsmannia palm leaves. Photo: David Clode.

Johannesteijsmannia palm leaves. Photo: David Clode.

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Backlit leaf. Cairns Botanic Gardens. Photo: David Clode.

Backlit leaf. Cairns Botanic Gardens. Photo: David Clode.

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Bismarck palm Bismarckia nobilis. Photo: David Clode.

Bismarck palm Bismarckia nobilis. Photo: David Clode.

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Aloe polyphylla.

Aloe polyphylla. Photo: strangewonderfulthings.com.

Aloe polyphylla.

Symmetrical succulent. Photo: Yousef Espanioly on unsplash.com.

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Nymphaea caerulea.

Nymphaea caerulea. Photo: David Clode.

The water lily Nymphaea caerulea.

Nymphaea caerulea.

Nymphaea caerulea flower at a later stage. Photo: David Clode.

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Cannoball tree flower. Photo: David Clode.

Cannoball tree flower. Photo: David Clode.

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Thr backscratcher ginger, Tapeinochilus ananassae.

The Backscratcher Ginger, Tapeinochilus ananassae. Photo: David Clode.

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Unusual flower in the Arum Lily family, Spathicarpa saggitifolia. Photo: David Clode.

Unusual flower in the Arum Lily family, Spathicarpa saggitifolia. Photo: David Clode.

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Fiddle-leaf fig leaf veins, Ficus lyrata. Phot: david Clode.

Fiddle-leaf fig leaf veins, Ficus lyrata. Photo: David Clode.

Sarracenia.

Sarracenia. Photo: David Clode

Sarracenia leucophylla, a plant which traps insects in a leaf formed into a pitcher.

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Young leaf stem, about 5cm in diameter, of Amorphophallus variabilis x A. decus-silvae. The plant produces this fantastic artwork which looks exactly like lichen growing on an old tree stem, which probably protects it from being eaten by insects that are looking for soft, sappy growth to eat. Photo: David Clode.

Young leaf stem, about 5cm in diameter, of Amorphophallus variabilis x A. decus-silvae. The plant produces this fantastic artwork which looks exactly like lichen growing on an old tree stem, which probably protects it from being eaten by insects that are looking for soft, sappy growth to eat. Photo: David Clode.

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Painted lady Gladiolus debilis. Photo: roncorylus.files.wordpress.com.

Painted Lady Gladiolus debilis, South Africa. Photo: roncorylus.files.wordpress.com.

Contrast the beauty of these flowers with the fungus below.

Alien life forms

Some things just look like they belong on another planet. More to be added later (hopefully).

Fungus

The bizarre fruting body of a fungus. The colour and smell attract flies which then spread the spores. My garden in Cairns. Photo: David Clode.

The shape and large surface area of the fungal fruiting body would ensure that the bad smell is effectively dispersed, and that the visiting flies would get their feet covered in spores, and then disperse the spores.

Geastrum saccatum. Photo: en.wikipedia.org.

Geastrum saccatum. Photo: en.wikipedia.org.

The wood-rotting fungus, Geastrum saccatum.

Yellow earth ginger Achasma macrocheilos.

Yellow earth ginger Achasma macrocheilos. Photo: David Clode.

The strange flowers of the yellow earth ginger grow straight out of the ground. Achasma macrocheilos, from S. E. Asia.

Ghost squid. Photo by deep sea photographer Steven Haddock.

Ghost squid. Photo by deep sea photographer Steven Haddock.

Ghost squid.

Arachnoidiscus. Photo: awi.de.

Arachnoidiscus. Photo: awi.de.

The skeleton of the diatom Arachnoidiscus.

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A soft coral exposed and collapsed during an extra low tide. It will recover when the tide comes in. Green Island, Great Barrier reef, Australia. Photo: david Clode.

A soft coral exposed and collapsed during an extra low tide. It will recover when the tide comes in. Green Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Photo: David Clode.

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Photo: David Clode.

Soft coral, from memory at least one metre in diameter. Photo: David Clode.

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Soft coral close up: Photo: David Clode.

Soft coral close up: Photo: David Clode.

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Titan Arum Lily Amorphophallus titanum. Photo: David Clode, Cairns Botanic Gardens.

Titan Arum Lily Amorphophallus titanum. Photo: David Clode, Cairns Botanic Gardens.

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Minerals

Bismuth oxide iridescent surface layer on bbismuth crystals. Photo: Wikipedia.org.

Bismuth oxide iridescent surface layer on bismuth crystals. Photo: Wikipedia.org.

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Halite crystals. Photo: mineralatlas.com.

Halite crystals. Photo: mineralatlas.com.

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Giant Crystal Cave, Mexico. Gypsum crystals. topworldtourism.com.

Giant Crystal Cave, Mexico. Gypsum crystals. Photo: topworldtourism.com.

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Divine designs on a microscopic scale

Butterfly wing scales - magnification X 450. What appear to be protruding ridges are complex nanstructures - see diagrams below.

Butterfly wing scales – magnification X 450. What appear to be protruding ridges are complex nanotructures which  produce iridescent colours- see diagrams below. Photo: googleplussuomi.com.

The structures which cause iridescence in butterflies, usually blue or violet.

Detail of the swing cales of an iridescent butterfly.. Photo: nanotechnolgy.hu.

Detail of the wing scales of an iridescent butterfly. Photo: nanotechnology.hu.

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Structure of wingscales. Source: nanophotonics.spiedigitallibrary.org.

Structure of a small part of a scale on the wing of a butterfly (Morpho sulkowski). Source: nanophotonics.spiedigitallibrary.org.

Each “bookshelf” or “Christmas tree” like structure which causes iridescence is about one hundredth of the width of a human hair. Could these intricate nanostructures really have evolved by chance? Followed by mimicry of poisonous butterfly species by non-poisonous and unrelated butterfly species evolving exactly the same structures? And evolving the same structures, within an assumed time frame of millions of years, at the nearly the same time?

Diatoms

A diatom.

A diatom. Photo: www2,cnrs,fr.

Diatoms have skeletons of silica. If the structures above and below were the size of a tennis ball they would be amazing, however diatoms generally range in size from less than the width of a human hair, through to the width of a few human hairs.

A diatom.Photo: deepbluehome.blogspot.com.

A diatom.Photo: deepbluehome.blogspot.com.

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Navicula bullata. Photo: commons.wikimedia.org.

The diatom Navicula bullata. Photo: commons.wikimedia.org.

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SEM image of pollen grains. Photo: www.avomeen.com.

SEM image of pollen grains. Photo: http://www.avomeen.com.

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In the photos below, the mycelial threads of a soil fungus are able to sense the nearby presence of a nematode (small, often microscopic, worms). As the nematode goes through the trap, the three single cells instantly fill with water and the nematode is trapped. The fungus then grows threads into the nematode, extracting nutrients, especially nitrogen.

Nematode (Eelworm) trapped by a ring trapping fungus.

Electron microscope photo of a Nematode (Eelworm) trapped by a ring trapping fungus. Photo: Apsnet.org.

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Single cell ring traps.

Single cell ring traps.

Snowflakes

Snowflake. Photo: caltech.edu.

Snowflake. Photo: caltech.edu.

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Snowflake. Photo: nisenet.org.

Snowflake. Photo: nisenet.org.

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Snowflakes formed on a bubble. Photo: Aaron Burden on unsplash.com.

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Snowflake. Photo: caltech.edu.

Snowflake. Photo: caltech.edu.

Divine designs on an astronomical scale

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“The heavens declare the glory of God;

And the firmament shows His handiwork”

Psalm 19:1.

“He made the Bear, Orion, and the Pleiades,

And the chambers of the south.

He does great things past finding out,

Yes, wonders without number”

Job 9:9,10.

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Photo :NASA.

Photo: NASA.

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Galaxy, after galaxy, after galaxy....

Galaxy… after galaxy… after galaxy…..

Photo: NASA.

Saturn. Photo: sternwarte-recklinghausen.de.

Saturn. Photo: sternwarte-recklinghausen.de.

Saturn. 1.4 billion kilometres from Earth.

Red Rectangkle Nebula. Photo apod.nasa.gov.

The Red Rectangle Nebula. Photo: apod.nasa.gov.

The Red Rectangle Nebula. 2,300 light-years from Earth.

Pillars of Creation nebulae. Photo: scienceblogs.com.

Pillars of Creation nebulas. Photo: scienceblogs.com.

The “Pillars of Creation”. 6,500 light-years from Earth.

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Photo: NASA.

Photo: NASA.

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“Can you bind the cluster of the Pleiades,

Or loose the belt of Orion?

Can you bring out Mazzaroth in its season?

Or can you guide the Great bear with its cubs?

Do you know the ordinances of the heavens?

Can you set their dominion over the earth?”

God questioning Job. Job 38:31-33.

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The Pleiades, a cluster of stars or constellation.

The Pleiades, a cluster of stars or constellation. Photo: Rawastrodata, wikipedia.org.

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Constellation Orion. The three stars in a row are Orion's Belt. Photo: 19thpsalm.org.

Constellation Orion. The central three blue stars in a row are Orion’s Belt. Photo: 19thpsalm.org.

Constellation Orion. 1,600 light-years from Earth.

Orion's Belt. photo:

Orion’s Belt. photo:

Orion’s Belt, three blue supergiant stars. 1,600 light-years from Earth.

Arcturus. Photo: 2.bp.blogspot.com

Arcturus. Photo: 2.bp.blogspot.com

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"Glory to God"

“Glory to God”

About the Artist

The creations of any creative person, for example painters, musicians, architects, engineers, authors, poets, etc., usually provide some clues about the personality and character of the artist. However, if there is an artist’s biography, the biography will tell you a great deal more about the artist, so that you aren’t left guessing. To find out more about God and His character and personality, you can learn a great deal more by simply reading and studying the Old and New Testaments of the Bible, along with good commentaries, and attending a church where the Bible is taught faithfully and accurately.

Meet The Artist

To meet a great artist is an honour and a privilege.

Amazingly, the Creator and Sustainer of the universe wants to meet us, and us to meet Him, and have a personal relationship with Him: “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and dine with him, and he with Me” Revelation 3:20. This is an open invitation to all, which we are free to accept or decline. However, because God is holy and righteous and we are not, a personal relationship with God requires that we first accept His offer of righteousness and salvation through Jesus Christ. Choose to accept, and you can spend eternity in heaven with the awesome Creator and Sustainer of the universe.

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“When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers,

The moon and the stars, which You have ordained,

What is man that You are mindful of him,

And the son of man that You visit him?

For You have made him a little lower than the angels,

And You have crowned him with glory and honor.

You have made him to have dominion over the works of Your hands;

You have put all things under his feet,

All sheep and oxen – even the beasts of the field,

The birds of the air,

And the fish of the sea

That pass through the paths of the seas.”

Psalm 8:3-8.

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Hopefully more to come – if you have a photo that you think might be suitable, or artwork, you can contact me at daveclode@hotmail.com.

References/resources

http://www.cornwallalliance.org/ An excellent site promoting a Christian approach to stewardship of the environment.

http://evolutionvsgod.com

Reitz, C. J. 1978. Poisonous South African snakes and snakebite. Department of Health. Perskor Printers.

Nature poster

Nature poster

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Two Books Poster by David Clode.

Two Books Poster by David Clode.

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Creation poster

Creation poster

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The heavens declare the glory of God. Photo: Greg Rakozy on unsplash.com. Poster: David Clode.

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Resources

http://www.creationresearch.net/

http://www.icr.org/

http://www.oldearth.org/

http://www.creation.com/

Tracts4free.WordPress.com

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4 Responses to Divine Designs God’s Creation

  1. Barbara Stevens says:

    Very inspiring! Studying a new unit in Sunday School on Creation: A Divine Cycle. This article helped me to understand the theme if our lessons more.

    Like

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  3. Hi Laya,
    I am glad you found the page inspiring. Thanks for your comment and best wishes.

    Like

  4. Laya Ross says:

    The awesome nature of nature! The patterns are so incredibly rich and complex. What an inspiring page, thanks!

    Like

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